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Ben’s last post on minimizing corporate politics generated a bunch of interesting comments. One set of commenters essentially asked, “gee, why should an employee be motivated first by a company’s success rather than by their own success”? Frankly, this surprised both of us.

So I suggested that Ben answer this line of questioning directly, which he does in his latest post The Right Kind of Ambition. In addition to his trademark rap quote, he also quotes esteemed management philosopher Theodore Geisel—a.k.a. Dr. Seuss—speaking in the voice of Yertle the Turtle. That’s got to be the first time Drake and Dr. Seuss appear on the same page of, well, anything.

As the ranking officer, the CEO has a huge impact on their company’s culture. This is especially true in startups where the whole company is watching the CEO’s every move, every interaction, every decision. As a result of this micro-scrutiny, CEOs can feel like they need to be the company’s Chief Morale Officer, continuously and relentlessly accentuating the positive and downplaying the negative.

As Ben shares in latest blog post, he often felt this way as a first-time CEO. He also shares how (and why) he quickly got over this need to be unfailingly positive—and how this was a turning point in his development as a CEO. Go find out why CEOs need to tell it like it is.

My good friend Steve Blank does a great job of describing the metamorphosis a scalable startup needs to undergo to become a big company. During that metamorphosis, many startups hire executives from big companies to help scale the business. Some go on to do a good job. 

But I've seen more than a few of those big-time execs get organ-rejected within the first couple of months of the tranpslant. Ben published a post today about this exact phenomenon called Why is it Hard to Bring Big Company Execs into Little Companies

In the post, Ben dissects the reasons why big company execs can flounder in startups, how you can spot warning signs during the interview process, and (perhaps most importantly) what you need to do to integrate the freshly hired exec into your company. Read it to save yourself a lot of heartburn created by hiring the wrong exec or failing to do your part to integrate them into the company.  

For those of you who have been keeping up with this blog, you’ll know that my partner Ben Horowitz has been very actively blogging—and folks are paying attention. His post on All Things Digital called The Case for the Fat Startup struck a nerve in the startup community, prompting my good friend Fred Wilson to write a counter-post called Being Fat is Not Healthy, in turn prompting Ben to write a counter-counter-post defiantly titled Revenge of the Fat Guy.

Now for those of you who clicked on the last link, see what happened there? Yes, astute reader: Ben has his own blog now. Go, subscribe, and prepare for a slew of insightful and provocative posts from Ben on leadership, entrepreneurship, venture capital, and much, much more. Also lots of quotes from rappers.

Case in point: Ben’s first post on his own blog demystifies super-angel investor Ron Conway and features lyrics from The Game. Find out why the savviest entrepreneurs trip over themselves to raise money from Ron.